bears

Thoughts And News About Harming Other Beings

Folder: 
A Fellow Creature

 

Organoids, organs-on-a-chip, the Ames bacteria test, computer models..some of many nonviolent, safer, more effecitve, much less expensive, much less inaccurate
alternatives to animal torture research.
https://crueltyfreeinternational.org/why-we-do-it/facts-and-figures-anim...
China (20.5 million) Japan (15.0 m), US (15.6 m),  Canada (3.6 m), Australia (3.2 m), South Korea (3.1 million), the United Kingdom (2.6 million), Brazil (2.2 million), Germany (2.0 million) and France (1.9 million),  #s are of experiments.. #s of animals killed much higher
*
Religions teaching animals have no souls have adherents more likely to objectify and to harm animals, eating , researching on, riding them, using them as beasts of burden, as objects of entertainment, etc. Neither Jesus nor his disciple Francis of Assisi have converted many in the Catholic hierarchy, Eastern Orthodox, or Christian pastors.
*
Leather from any animal, fur from any animal, wool, silk...all involve cruelty to animals and are avoided by vegans.
Silkworms are boiled alive. 3000 silkworms have a hideous death for 1 lb. of silk
*
Thalidomide was tested on dogs and did not indicate problems.. Researchers were unaware of phocomelia (no development of limbs). Approximately,10,000 children were born with malformed or no limbs.
*
Caffeine (dioxypurine) is bad for heart, kidneys, pancreas and eyes. Imagine how much worse meat's uric acid (trioxypurine) is. The tannic acid in teas is also injurious.
http://pcrm.org
*
In a life previous to his life as Buddha, he came across a starving tigress and her 2 cubs and laid down in front of her
sacrificing himself, said Sai Baba   6
*
All beings tremble before violence. All fear death. All love life. See yourself in others. Then whom can y ou hurt? Buddha
*
Eating animals, leading cause of pandemics, species extinction, ocean dead zones, death in the West from human diseases, animal agony, energy waste, water depletion and pollution, climate crisis, habitat loss, human starvation in poor countries
low per acre food yield, rainforest and other forest destruction
*
Coors, Chrysler, Wrangler, several banks, sponsors of brutal rodeo Calves' necks choked some broken in brutal roping. Horses hurt, cowboys injured, outcome of cow murder business Coke says it doesn't sponsor rodeo. SHARK disagrees.
https://youtube.com/watch?v=CYQakNg9FiI horrible graphics
*
Marjery Glickman has worked many years opposing the Iditarod. PETA, she and others have caused
Exxon, Jack Daniels, Wells Fargo, Chrysler, Alaska Airlines to drop sponsorship of the brutal race which has killed 150 dogs since the race began in 1973.  Iditarod dogs are jerked & twisted in chains, fall into chasms, drown in freezing water, get frostbite paws, are driven unmercifully, break legs etc http://helpsleddogs.org
*
A 36-year-old doctor in Tennessee died Feb. 8, about a month after receiving the second dose of a #COVID vaccination.
A Florida doctor died shortly after the vaccine. Hank Aaron died 17 days after he was vaccinated.
http://childrenshealthdefense.org
*
Kary Mullis, winner of the Nobel Prize for his invention of the PCR test, said the test was wrongly used in covid testing, that it would give many false positives (resulting in the term 'asymptomatic'. He asked several to debate him and they declined. In an interview he stated he'd received the formula for PCR while in a dream state.12
*
Swine flu side effects were so bad children became like schizophrenics.
https://www.independent.ie/irish-news/health/swine-flu-vaccine-side-effe...
*
Humane Society of the US 2020 scorecard on animal rights legislation. Which senators and representatives are the
best, the worst, and those in the middle. https://hslf.org/humane-scorecard
Which states use
most dogs in lab experiments?  https://www.humanesociety.org/resources/dogs-used-research-and-testing-faq
*
5 things to know about bear bile prisons in China. the extraction of the bile is very painful. Vietnam
outlawed such bear bile prisons in 1991.
https://www.animalsasia.org/us/media/news/news-archive/five-things-you-n...
*
90% of bird species are monogamous.  PETA
*
Brazilian JBS, world's largest slaughterer of cows, also cruelly kills pigs and chickens. There is no humane slaughter but some abbatoirs are even worse than others. JBS bought Pilgrim's Pride.https://mercyforanimals.org/blog/pigs-shocked-jbs-slaughter/

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Shakespeare's Compassion For All Animals, Who Wrote The Plays Attributed To Shakespeare

Folder: 
A Fellow Creature

 

The Animal Rights of William Shakespeare: A Fraction Of His Words on Universal Compassion

*

CALVES, DEER, BEARS, WILD PIGS, HORSES, RABBITS, SHEEP, WRENS, FISHES, BEETLES, FLIES, BEES, MEAT

*

OF CALVES

William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part Two, Act 3, Scene 1, Lines 202-220

Thou never didst them wrong, nor no man wrong;
And as the butcher takes away the calf,
And binds the wretch, and beats it when it strays,
Bearing it to the bloody slaughter-house,
Even so, remorseless, have they borne him hence;
And as the dam runs lowing up and down,
Looking the way her harmless young one went,
And can do nought but wail her darling’s loss.

ON DEER

As You Like It Act 2, Scene 1, Lines 24-71

Duke S. Come, shall we go and kill us venison?
And yet it irks me, the poor dappled fools,
Being native burghers of this desert city,
Should in their own confines with forked heads
Have their round haunches gor'd.
...

To the which place a poor sequester'd stag,
That from the hunters' aim had ta'en a hurt,
Did come to languish; and, indeed, my lord,
The wretched animal heav'd forth such groans
That their discharge did stretch his leathern coat
Almost to bursting, and the big round tears
Cours'd one another down his innocent nose
In piteous chase; and thus the hairy fool,
Much marked of the melancholy Jaques,
Stood on the extremest verge of the swift brook,
Augmenting it with tears.
Duke S. But what said Jaques?
Did he not moralize this spectacle?
First Lord. O, yes, into a thousand similes.
First, for his weeping into the needless stream;
'Poor deer,' quoth he, 'thou mak'st a testament
As worldlings do, giving thy sum of more
To that which had too much: then, being there alone,
Left and abandon'd of his velvet friends;
'Tis right,' quoth he; 'thus misery doth part
The flux of company:' anon, a careless herd,
Full of the pasture, jumps along by him
And never stays to greet him; 'Ay,' quoth Jaques,
'Sweep on, you fat and greasy citizens;
'Tis just the fashion; wherefore do you look
Upon that poor and broken bankrupt there?'
Thus most invectively he pierceth through
The body of the country, city, court, '
Yea, and of this our life; swearing that we
Are mere usurpers, tyrants, and what’s worse,
To fright the animals and to kill them up
In their assign’d and native dwelling-place.
Duke S. And did you leave him in this contemplation?
Sec. Lord. We did, my lord, weeping and commenting
Upon the sobbing deer.

BEAR BAITING

(a cruel blood sport)  Bears were tied to stakes and dogs set loose to attack them)

Macbeth
‘They have tied me to the stake; I cannot fly/ But bear-like I must fight the course."


ON ANIMALS TURNED BY BUTCHERING INTO MEAT

Twelfth-Night; or, What You Will Act 1, Scene 3, Line 46
I am a great eater of beef, and I believe that does harm to my wit.

*

Troilus and Cressida:

"The plague of Greece upon thee, thou mongrel beef-witted lord."

*

Henry V Act 1 Scene 2
Our grave like Turkish meat shall have a tongueless mouth

*

Poem Venus And Adonis:

What is thy body but a swallowing grave


Romeo and Juliet  Act 1 Scene 4
ladies' lips, who straight on kisses dream, Which oft the angry Mab with blisters plagues, because their breaths with sweetmeats tainted are.


SHEEP

 "Is it not. strange that sheeps' guts should hale souls out of men's. bodies?"  (The paradox that from the agony of the murder of sheep, the music made by sheep guts used as strings in music instruments)
Much Ado About Nothing Act 2 Scene 3


ON THE CAGING OF BIRDS

Romeo and Juliet Act 2 Scene 2

I would have thee gone:
And yet no further than a wanton's bird;
Who lets it hop a little from her hand,
Like a poor prisoner in his twisted gyves,
And with a silk thread plucks it back again,
So loving-jealous of his liberty.

ON WRENS

Macbeth Act 4 Scene 2

Lady MacBeth:
Even the fragile wren, the smallest of birds, will fight against the owl when it threatens her young .

ON VIVISECTION OR ANIMAL RESEARCH HARDENING THE HEART

Cymbeline Act 1, Scene 5, Lines 7-32

I will try the forces
Of these thy compounds on such creatures as
We count not worth the hanging,—but none human,—
To try the vigour of them and apply
Allayments to their act, and by them gather
Their several virtues and effects.
Cor. Your highness
Shall from this practice but make hard your heart;
Besides, the seeing these effects will be
Both noisome and infectious.


ON HORSE SLAVERY 

Venus and Adonis

How like a jade he stood, tied to the tree,
Servilely master'd with a leathern rein!

ON BOAR HUNTING 

Venus And Adonis

swine to gore,
Whose tushes (tusks) never sheathed he whetteth still,
Like to a mortal butcher bent to kill.
ON FISHES

In King Lear Act 1 Scene 4:

"I do profess to be no less than I seem, to serve him truly that will put me in trust, to love him that is honest, to converse with him that is wise and says little, to fear judgement, to fight when I cannot choose, and to eat no fish."

Twelfth Night

"A plague o' these pickle herring!"

ON ANIMAL CONSCIOUSNESS

"Nature teaches beasts to know their friends."

Coriolanus

ON HUNTED RABBITS

The Hunted Hare... from Venus and Adonis

And when thou hast on foot the purblind hare,
Mark the poor wretch, to overshoot his troubles
How he outruns the wind and with what care
He cranks and crosses with a thousand doubles:
The many musets through the which he goes
Are like a labyrinth to amaze his foes.

Sometime he runs among a flock of sheep,
To make the cunning hounds mistake their smell,
And sometime where earth-delving conies keep,
To stop the loud pursuers in their yell,
And sometime sorteth with a herd of deer:
Danger deviseth shifts; wit waits on fear:

For there his smell with others being mingled,
The hot scent-snuffing hounds are driven to doubt,
Ceasing their clamorous cry till they have singled
With much ado the cold fault cleanly out;
Then do they spend their mouths: Echo replies,
As if another chase were in the skies.

By this, poor Wat, far off upon a hill,
Stands on his hinder legs with listening ear,
To harken if his foes pursue him still:
Anon their loud alarums he doth hear;
And now his grief may be compared well
To one sore sick that hears the passing-bell.

Then shalt thou see the dew-bedabbled wretch
Turn, and return, indenting with the way;
Each envious brier his weary legs doth scratch,
Each shadow makes him stop, each murmur stay:
For misery is trodden on by many,
And being low never relieved by any.

Lie quietly, and hear a little more;
Nay, do not struggle, for thou shalt not rise:
To make thee hate the hunting of the boar,
Unlike myself thou hear'st me moralize,
Applying this to that, and so to so;
For love can comment upon every woe.

Puzzled wondering why
So many heads are hollow,
So many mean are walking beasts,
So much brutality blots the land,
Such epidemics of violence,
Such vertigos of sensuality
Inoculate and intoxicate the race.

ON BEETLES

Measure for Measure , Act 3, Scene 11, Lines 85-87 .

Isab.…And the poor beetle, that we tread upon,
In corporal sufferance finds a pang as great
As when a giant dies.

ON A FLY

Titus Andronicus Act 3, Scene 2, Lines 55-80

Mar. At that that I have kill'd, my lord; a fly.
Tit. Out on thee, murderer! thou kill'st my heart;
Mine eyes are cloy'd with view of tyranny:
A deed of death, done on the innocent,
Becomes not Titus' brother. Get thee gone;
I see, thou art not for my company.
Mar. Alas! my lord, I have but kill'd a fly.
Tit. But how if that fly had a father and a mother?
How would he hang his slender gilded wings
And buzz lamenting doings in the air!
Poor harmless fly,
That, with his pretty buzzing melody,

ON BEES

Henry V Act 1 Scene 2

Obedience: for so work the honey-bees, Creatures that by a rule in nature teach The act of order to a peopled kingdom. They have a king and officers of sorts; Where some, like magistrates, correct at home, Others, like merchants, venture trade abroad, Others, like soldiers, armed in their stings, Make boot upon the summer's velvet buds, Which pillage they with merry march bring home To the tent-royal of their emperor; Who, busied in his majesty, surveys The singing masons building roofs of gold, The civil citizens kneading up the honey, The poor mechanic porters crowding in Their heavy burdens at his narrow gate, The sad-eyed justice, with his surly hum, Delivering o'er to executors pale The lazy yawning drone


*******************

 

Who Wrote The Plays And Sonnets Attributed To William Shakespeare

What do Charles Dickens, Mark Twain, Charlie Chaplin,
Sigmund Freud, Vanessa Redgrave, Derek Jacoby,
St. Germaine, John Adams, Leslie Howard
and countless others have in common?
They all believed that William Shakespeare
was not the author of the plays, sonnets,
and other writings attributed to him.

Why ?

The Elizabethan court was one which drew and quartered
Catholics and others who were not of the Church of England. She
executed Mary Queen of Scots and other political opponents.
It was not safe for the author to
put his own name to his writings.

There is not a single play or poem
in Shakespeare's handwriting.

His children were functionally illiterate.

There were no books, no library in his
possession when he died. Nor were there any plays
or copies of plays in his possession.

While genius is not dependent upon schooling,
the comprehensive knowledge of the court,
literature, and cultures of other countries
was not evident in the life of Shakespeare.

There are many legal documents in the life of
Shakespeare, but none indicating he was a writer.
He was a grain merchant, who once sued someone
for 14 pence, who was a moneylender. His last will
was not the work of a literary man. He at least twice
defaulted on tax payments and was the owner of
high end realty.

He had been a butcher's apprentice and
a poacher of deer while the writings attributed
to him are full of compassion for mammals, birds,
fishes, insects.

There is nothing in the plays and poems which
fits with the life of Shakespeare.

The most famous painting alleging to be that of
Will Shakespeare was printed by Ben Jonson. Examining
the painting one finds indications that the face is
a mask of another face behind it.

The documentary Last Will And Testament
promotes the 17th Earl of Oxford as the author.

This writer believes the ascended
master St Germaine, who said that he himself in a previous life
was the author. He doesn't have the heads of murdered animals on the walls of his ancestral home nor the ethical lapses attributed to the 17th Earl of Oxford. He had already in his life as Francis Bacon achieved spiritual mastery in several areas.

Many of the assertions in this article came from the documentary Last Will & Testament
Last Will And Testament available on Roku
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2122381/
https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/04/23/arts/shakespeare-obituary.html

 

Author's Notes/Comments: 

http://elections.hslf.org/#  The Humane Soc of the US endorsements for 2020

View saiom's Full Portfolio

The Great Shakespeare On Animal Rights.... revised today

 

user img

Shakespeare On Calves, Deer, Pigs, Horses, Rabbits Beetles, Flies, Bees, Animal Research, Hunting, Plant Consciousness Etc.
*
OF CALVES
*
Henry VI Part II, act 3, scene 1, lines 202-220

Thou never didst them wrong, nor no man wrong;
and as the butcher takes away the calf,
and binds the wretch, and beats it when it strays,
bearing it to the bloody slaughter-house,
even so, remorseless, have they borne him hence;
and as the dam runs lowing up and down,
looking the way her harmless young one went,
and can do nought but wail her darling's loss.

Hamlet: It was a brute part of him to kill so capital a calf.
*
ON DEER
*
As you like it act 2, scene 1, lines 24-71
*
Duke s:. come, shall we go and kill us venison?
and yet it irks me, the poor dappled fools,
being native burghers of this desert city,
should in their own confines with forked heads
have their round haunches gor'd.
first lord. indeed, my lord,
the melancholy jaques grieves at that;
and, in that kind, swears you do more usurp
than doth your brother that hath banish'd you.
to-day my lord of amiens and myself
did steal behind him as he lay along
under an oak whose antique root peeps out
upon the brook that brawls along this wood;
to the which place a poor sequester'd stag,
that from the hunters' aim had ta'en a hurt,
did come to languish; and, indeed, my lord,
the wretched animal heav'd forth such groans
that their discharge did stretch his leathern coat
almost to bursting, and the big round tears
cours'd one another down his innocent nose
in piteous chase; and thus the hairy fool,
much marked of the melancholy jaques,
stood on the extremest verge of the swift brook,
augmenting it with tears.
duke s. but what said jaques?
did he not moralize this spectacle?
first lord. o, yes, into a thousand similes.
first, for his weeping into the needless stream;
'poor deer,' quoth he, 'thou mak'st a testament
as worldlings do, giving thy sum of more
to that which had too much: then, being there alone,
left and abandon'd of his velvet friends;
'tis right,' quoth he; 'thus misery doth part
the flux of company:' anon, a careless herd,
full of the pasture, jumps along by him
and never stays to greet him; 'ay,' quoth jaques,
'sweep on, you fat and greasy citizens;
'tis just the fashion; wherefore do you look
upon that poor and broken bankrupt there?'
thus most invectively he pierceth through
the body of the country, city, court, '
yea, and of this our life; swearing that we
are mere usurpers, tyrants, and what's worse,
to fright the animals and to kill them up
in their assign'd and native dwelling-place.
duke s. and did you leave him in this contemplation?
sec. lord. we did, my lord, weeping and commenting
upon the sobbing deer.

ON ANIMALS MURDERED INTO MEAT

Twelfth Night; Or What You Will act 1, scene 3, line 46
i am a great eater of beef, and i believe that does harm to my wit.

Antony And Cleopatra: It is reported thou didst eat strange flesh, Which some
did die to look on
*
Henry V
Our grave like Turkish meat shall have a tongueless mouth.
*
Venus And Adonis:
What is thy body but a swallowing grave?
*
Cleopatra:
Thou didst eat strange flesh, which some did die to look on

Much Ado About Nothing:
A man loves meat in his youth that he cannot endure in his old age.

King Lear:  the charcter Kent says: "(he is)... A knave, a rascal, an eater of broken meats'

ON THE CAGING OF BIRDS

Romeo And Juliet: act 2 scene 2

i would have thee gone:
and yet no further than a wanton's bird;
who lets it hop a little from her hand,
like a poor prisoner in his twisted gyves,
and with a silk thread plucks it back again,
so loving-jealous of his liberty.

ON WRENS

Lady Macbeth:
Even the fragile wren, the smallest of birds, will fight against the owl when it
threatens her young .

ON VIVISECTION OR RESEARCH ON ANIMALS WHICH HARDENS THE HEART

Cymbeline act 1, scene 5, lines 7-32

I will try the forces
of these thy compounds on such creatures as
we count not worth the hanging,—but none human,—
to try the vigour of them and apply
allayments to their act, and by them gather
their several virtues and effects.
cor. your highness
shall from this practice but make hard your heart;
besides, the seeing these effects will be
both noisome and infectious.

 

ON BEARS AND OTHERS

King Lear:  Horses are tied by the heads; dogs and bears by the neck; monkeys by the loins, and man by the legs. When a man's over-lusty at legs, then he wears wooden nether stocks

ON HORSE SLAVERY

How like a jade he stood, tied to the tree,
servilely master'd with a leathern rein!

ON BOAR HUNTING

Swine to gore,
whose tushes (tusks) never sheathed he whetteth still,
like to a mortal butcher bent to kill.
*
ON HUNTING RABBITS

Venus And Adonis: The hunted hare...

And when thou hast on foot the purblind hare,
mark the poor wretch, to overshoot his troubles
how he outruns the wind and with what care
he cranks and crosses with a thousand doubles:
the many musets through the which he goes
are like a labyrinth to amaze his foes.

Sometime he runs among a flock of sheep,
to make the cunning hounds mistake their smell,
and sometime where earth-delving conies keep,
to stop the loud pursuers in their yell,
and sometime sorteth with a herd of deer:
danger deviseth shifts; wit waits on fear:

For there his smell with others being mingled,
the hot scent-snuffing hounds are driven to doubt,
ceasing their clamorous cry till they have singled
with much ado the cold fault cleanly out;
then do they spend their mouths: echo replies,
as if another chase were in the skies.

By this, poor wat, far off upon a hill,
stands on his hinder legs with listening ear,
to harken if his foes pursue him still:
anon their loud alarums he doth hear;
and now his grief may be compared well
to one sore sick that hears the passing-bell.

Then shalt thou see the dew-bedabbled wretch
turn, and return, indenting with the way;
each envious brier his weary legs doth scratch,
each shadow makes him stop, each murmur stay:
for misery is trodden on by many,
and being low never relieved by any.

Lie quietly, and hear a little more;
nay, do not struggle, for thou shalt not rise:
to make thee hate the hunting of the boar,
unlike myself thou hear'st me moralize,
applying this to that, and so to so;
for love can comment upon every woe.

Puzzled wondering why
so many heads are hollow,
so many mean are walking beasts,
so much brutality blots the land,
such epidemics of violence,
such vertigos of sensuality
inoculate and intoxicate the race.

ON FISHES

Romeo and Juliet Act 2 Scene 4     Oh flesh, how art thou fishified!

King Lear Act 1 Scene One   I do profess... to eat no fish (the character Kent)

ON BEETLES

Measure For Measure , act 3, scene 11, lines 85-87 .

isab.…and the poor beetle, that we tread upon,
in corporal sufferance finds a pang as great
as when a giant dies.

ON A FLY

Titus Andronicus: act 3, scene 2, lines 55-80

mar. at that that i have kill'd, my lord; a fly.
tit. out on thee, murderer! thou kill'st my heart;
mine eyes are cloy'd with view of tyranny:
a deed of death, done on the innocent,
becomes not titus' brother. get thee gone;
i see, thou art not for my company.
mar. alas! my lord, i have but kill'd a fly.
tit. but how if that fly had a father and a mother?
how would he hang his slender gilded wings
and buzz lamenting doings in the air!
poor harmless fly,
that, with his pretty buzzing melody,

ON BEES

Henry V Act 1

Obedience: for so work the honey-bees, creatures that by a rule in nature teach
the act of order to a peopled kingdom. they have a king and officers of sorts;
where some, like magistrates, correct at home, others, like merchants, venture
trade abroad, others, like soldiers, armed in their stings, make boot upon the
summer's velvet buds, which pillage they with merry march bring home to the
tent-royal of their emperor; who, busied in his majesty, surveys the singing
masons building roofs of gold, the civil citizens kneading up the honey, the
poor mechanic porters crowding in their heavy burdens at his narrow gate, the
sad-eyed justice, with his surly hum, delivering o'er to executors pale the lazy
yawning drone

ON SLAUGHTER

Shakespeare in Henry IV spoke of 'civil butchery'

ON PLANT CONSCIOUSNESS

As You Like It: Duke
Senior states:  “tongues in trees, books in the running brooks,
/ sermons in stone, and good in everything” (2.1.16–17).

variations of these quotes can be seen at
http://postpoems.org/authors/animalpoems
and other forums.


-saiom shriver-


Some of Shakespeare's plays are available free in audio form according to the
site
http://www.learnoutloud.com/Catalog/Arts-and-Entertainment/Full-Cast-Dramatizati\
on/Henry-IV-Part-One/29963

http://www.learnoutloud.com/content/blog/archives/2010/11/complete_arkang.html

http://allpoetry.com/contest/2558511-Quickie_Shakespeare_On_Animals
Some of Shakespeare's plays are available free in audio form according to the
site
http://www.learnoutloud.com/Catalog/Arts-and-Entertainment/Full-Cast-Dramatizati\
\
\on/Henry-IV-Part-One/29963

http://www.learnoutloud.com/content/blog/archives/2010/11/complete_arkang.html

 

 

King Lear free and online  http://shakespeare.mit.edu/lear/full.html
http://www.americanbarfoundation.org/uploads/cms/documents/lshannon.pdf

 

 1539 8919

 

 

http://animalsquotingshakespeare.tumblr.com/post/48124148860/student-submissions

After a Dream

 

It was the last day of autumn. The first snowflakes started to fall. Winter was just around the corner. It was about to start. One little bear was really happy playing outside when his mommy came and said “It’s time to go to bed honey”. The little bear didn’t want to sleep for so long, he still wanted to play. He wasn’t ready to go to sleep. “Why do we have to sleep for three months? Why do we have to sleep for so long?” His mother, in order to make her little bear going to bed decided to answer her son’s questions with a story. “Let me explain” she said. “In the beginning there was nothing alive but plants. They were the only living things in the world. The Earth was full of lakes, rivers, seas, rocks, mountains, deserts but none of them were alive. Only plants were alive. There were all kind of plants, flowers and trees but all of them felt really sad. Their sorrow was because they couldn’t share the oxygen and the fruits they produced. The trees had a fantastic idea. It was creating other living things that needed their oxygen to breath and their fruits to eat so they were able to share them. They created a lot of living things so they needed to establish some rules. In order to keep a balance and to prevent their fruits from finishing, they sent us to sleep on winter.” The little bear understood and without complaining he went to sleep. He was kind of tired after all. He fell asleep immediately. Three months passed and it was time to go outside of the cave. He had a nice dream but it was time to go back to reality. The little bear couldn’t wait one more second to go and play outside. Also he was pretty hungry. He wanted to eat his favorite berries. His mother hasn’t woken up yet and he wanted to let her sleep so he went out by himself only to discover a big surprise. What he saw was astonishing. It was a horrible picture. Everything was devastated. There was nothing but a dying burned tree on a destroyed land. The little bear went with the tree to ask him what happened. With his last breath, the tree told the little bear “We should have sent them to sleep instead of you”

 

 

 

 

 

By

José Antonio Rebolledo

Lizbeth Rodríguez

 

 

 

 

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The Bears and the Bees

NOTE: This is a fable was made by me and Xavier Mendieta

 

 

When the rivers had dried and all the forests had turned into deserts; when the color green turned brown and the sun was too hot to live in the surface and the nights so cold that the thickest fur could not keep you warm, the only place where life could be found was inside a cave. Inside this mystical place the last garden and the last fountain of water were protected by a pack of bears. The only two living species aside from the bears and flowers were a few fish and a swarm of bees. The bears and the bees had an agreement; the bees could extract pollen from the flowers if they gave the bears some of the honey once they were done. This process would take the bees long days of work, but the bears waited patiently, knowing they would get a juicy reward. Meanwhile, the bees were happy because they lived peaceful lives and they didn’t fear for any predator or for any damage inside the cave.

One night, knowing little about the agreement and thirsty for something sweet, the bear cub went to the beehive, leaving their parents sleeping in the other side of the cave, and he begin to approached it.

A few moments later, the bees awoke because of a scratching sound, then temblors, and finally a fall. When they finally realized what have happened, they saw the bear cub eating their honey between the remains of their only home.

Now, bees are hard-workers and had a great patience, but the view of the beehive destruction and the not-caring bear cub infuriated them. Full with rage, the swarm attacked the bear cub.

The bear cub cries were heard by their parents. At first they couldn’t see what had happened, and then they saw their child mortally wounded by the bees, expiring his last breath.

As any parent, pain filled their hearts, and they decided to take revenge: With a fearsome roar, both bears smashed what was left of the beehive and started to kill the bees. The bees attacked too, stinging their tick fur. Because they were too big and powerful, only the sting of all the bees could bring them down. That didn’t stop the bears of attacking and they killed almost all the bees before they finally died of the attack. The bees that remained rejoiced in their victory, but then they noticed they all had used their stingers and they would die soon.

After a couple of days, there were neither bees nor bears in the cave. The flowers wilt without reproducing, and only the cold fish remained in the waters of this last life’s sanctuary.

The moral of this fable is that the world’s end would begin with rage and destruction, but at the end, just before all life vanish, it will be pain and regret.

 

 

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